2020-2023: Project Erasmus+ SeLECt “Self-Learning Atlas of Ancient European CulTures”

2020-2023: Project Erasmus+ SeLECt “Self-Learning Atlas of Ancient European CulTures”

The SELECT project (Erasmus+ Key Action 2, 2020-2023) aims to enhance the study of ancient history and geography by means of the multidisciplinary, multilayered, interactive and user-friendly self-learning ATLAS of the cultures of old Europe before Romanisation. The ancient peoples outside the Greek-Roman world are the “minorities of the past”, whose heritage is often neglected in the school system. The ATLAS will provide the European citizens with an overall view of the most ancient European heritage, which will be objectified on a map, a powerful visual tool in learning the past. The map refers to a territory which, in the present as well as in the past, continuously develops and changes its borders.

Highlights

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2022: Training School The Epigraphic Text

2022: Training School The Epigraphic Text

Alteritas, the University of Verona, the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, the Northeastern University of Changun, the Academy of Sciences and Letters of Göttingen and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich are pleased to announce the International Training School dedicated to The Epigraphic Text: From Context to Meaning.

Festival Biblico 2022 edition

THE BURNING WORD
The Apocalypse in literature: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
with Don Paolo Alliata (writer), Simona Marchesini (archaeologist, linguist), Felipe Leon (cello)

Festival Biblico 2022 edition

Ancient peoples mistrusted writing as a means of transmitting knowledge. It is orality – they thought – that best guards the word from the risk of misunderstanding. From this point of view, the burning of books, which brutalised various pages of history, could not prevent the transmission of knowledge, the running of wisdom under the sky.
In Bradbury’s novel, too, there is a tension between the written and the oral. In a future, dystopian world, where literature is banned because it makes people think and opens up spaces of dangerous depth to the imagination, a few courageous dissidents preserve entire works in their memory, in order to hand them over to the civilisation of tomorrow. They have become true tabernacles of the word.
Memory and the depth of the heart are the fire to face the dark days. To keep oneself open to some tremor of revelation just when one risks drowning in superficiality.